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Biebermühlbahn (kaiserslautern - Pirmasens)

Discussion in 'Suggestions' started by Jo_Kim, Jun 8, 2021.

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  1. Modern Era (2005-17)

    3 vote(s)
    25.0%
  2. Diesel Era (1975-90)

    9 vote(s)
    75.0%
  3. Steam Era (1920-36)

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. Jo_Kim

    Jo_Kim Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    2021-06-04 01.03.55 openrailwaymap.org 6adcfbd3c904.png
    Wikipedia Article
    At the moment most routes in TSW are main lines. To get some new experiences into the game I suggest the Biebermühlbahn, a branch line in the Southwest of Germany. Once an important line for freight and even long-distance services, this line was modernised poorly over the last few decades, resulting in a quaint branch line with mechanical signals, historical stations, and a lovely landscape alongside it.
    While the line itself didn't change very much throughout its history, its services and rolling stock did. Therefore I have chosen three separate eras of this line, written down details about them separately and created a poll so that you can choose your favourite.
    A journey along the whole line takes 40-50min. Interchanges can be found in Pirmasens Hbf, Pirmasens Nord and Kaiserslautern Hbf.

    Quick Facts:

    Length: 35,9km
    Max. Speed: 80km/h
    Signaling System: H/V (mechanical)
    Safety System: PZB

    Route:

    Starting from Kaiserslautern Hbf, the line turns southwest and leaves the main rail corridor shortly after leaving the station. After a stop at Galgenschanze Hp, the line leaves the city behind and enters the Palatine Forest (the largest continuous forest in Germany). After stops at Hohenecken (village part of the city of Kaiserslautern), Gelterswoog (lake with bathing beach) and Karlsthal (beautiful valley for hiking) the train arrives at Schopp, a small station with a passing loop. From there the route follows the Moosalb, a small stream, through Steinalben and Waldfischbach (another passing station). After Waldfischbach the line follows another stream, the Schwarzbach, to Pirmasens Nord. Originally being a very important station for freight, local and long-distance services, this station's only purpose today is to merge three different regional lines together onto the stub track towards Pirmasens Hbf. Leaving Pirmasens Nord the line enters its steepest section with an incline of up to 25 ‰. After a 900m long tunnel, the line arrives at the terminus Pirmasens Hbf.
    [​IMG]
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    Stations:

    Distance | Station (Hp = Haltepunkt | () = closed station (depending on the era)) | Elevation
    00,0km Kaiserslautern Hbf 250m
    01,8km Kaiserslautern-Galgenschanze Hp 252m
    05,5km (Hohenecken) 286m
    08,5km (Gelterswoog Hp) 296m
    11,6km (Karlsthal Hp) 292m
    13,1km Schopp 278m
    19,1km Steinalben Hp 273m
    23,7km Waldfischbach 256m
    25,5km (Burgalben Hp) 248m
    29,1km Pirmasens Nord / Biebermühle 244m
    35,9km Pirmasens Hbf 369m

    Modern Era (2005-17):
    Basic Information:
    In 2005 freight services were ultimately cancelled on the Biebermühlbahn. In 2002 Pirmasens Hbf was already reconstructed, with a reduction to three tracks and the removal of all shunting tracks. The line is now only served by an hourly regional service which is operated with DMUs. In 2017 the line was upgraded to modern-day signalling, removing the five original mechanical signal boxes along the line and replacing them with remote-controlled light signals.

    Route:
    The new Hohenecken Hp was opened in 2017. Karlsthal Hp gets no regular services but remains to be used on request by hiking groups. Pirmasens Nord lost most of its former importance with the platforms now only partially being kept in shape and old tracks left to be taken over by nature.

    Rolling Stock:
    BR 628.2
    [​IMG]


    BR 643 (Bombardier TALENT 1)
    [​IMG]


    BR 642 (Siemens Desiro Classic)
    [​IMG]


    Diesel Era (1975-1990):

    Basic Information:
    In 1975 the last steam locomotive was retired on the Biebermühlbahn. From then onwards diesel was the preferred mode of propulsion. Local passenger services were mostly operated by famous VT 95 and VT 98 (rail bus), which were used on most branch lines in Germany at that time. They were sometimes supplemented by ETA 150 battery units or V 100 hauled coach trains. Occasional long-distance services were hauled by BR 218s and V 200.0. Local freight trains along the line were hauled by V 60s and V 100s while non-stopping freight services from Einsiedlerhof Rbf (near Kaiserslautern) to Pirmasens Nord or Pirmasens Hbf were hauled by V 100s or BR 218s.

    Route:

    Hohenecken station was opened until 1980, Gelterswoog Hp was closed in 1977 and Karlsthal Hp in the 1980s. Steinalben was reduced from a full station to a train stop (Hp) in the 1980s. In the 1950s Primasens Hbf was reconstructed with 5 platforms and saw its major freight traffic from and to the local show industry (Pirmasens was known for being the central point for the German shoe industry).

    Rolling Stock:

    BR 795 (VT 95)
    [​IMG]


    BR 798 (VT 98)
    [​IMG]


    BR 515 (ETA 150)
    [​IMG]


    BR 260 (V 60)
    [​IMG]


    BR 211 (V 100)
    [​IMG]


    BR 218
    [​IMG]


    BR 220 (V 200.0)
    [​IMG]


    Steam Era (1920-36):
    Basic Information:
    The full line was opened in 1913. In 1920 the German Empire Railway (Deutsche Reichsbahn) took over the line which brought more diversity to the line. In 1936 Primasens Nord (then called Biebermühle) was reconstructed with a new station building and new track layouts. Especially for the steep track between Pirmasens Nord (then called Biebermühle) and Pirmasens Hbf the Palatine Railway acquired the T 5 class. These were sold in 1926 and replaced by the T 14.1 class. In the early years, passenger trains were usually hauled by the P 2.II class in the later years these were replaced by the P 8 and T 18 class. Express trains were hauled by a large number of different locomotives, depending on their place of origin but the line was dominated by Prussian and Palatine locomotives.

    Route:

    Hohenecken was a two-track station with freight and passenger services. Gelterswoog and Karlsthal Hp were mainly used for touristic services, either to the Gelterswoog Lake or the Karlsthal Valley. Schopp station also had an extra loading track for freight services. Steinalben also was a full station with freight and passenger services. Pirmasens Nord (then called Biebermühle) saw massive traffic not only from passenger services but from freight services as well. A majority of trains running along the East-West axis, from the Rhine Valley to the Saarland, used the Biebermühlbahn and connecting lines. Pirmasens Hbf was a (compared to today) massive station with not only passenger platforms but also freight and postal platforms, a refuelling station (water and coal) and multiple shunting tracks.

    Rolling Stock:

    BR 73.0 (pfälz. P2.II)
    [​IMG]


    BR 94.0 (pfälz. T5)
    [​IMG]


    BR 38.10 (preuß. P8)
    [​IMG]


    BR 78 (preuß. T18)
    [​IMG]


    BR 93.5 (preuß. T14.1)
    [​IMG]


    Optional Extras:
    Signal Boxes:
    Should TSW ever get a signal man mode, this would be a perfect line for a first implementation. Except for the signal box at Kaiserslautern Hbf, all boxes along this line are mechanical or electro-mechanical and rather compact. But even as scenery objects these signal boxes would make a nice addition to the route and could be used for a collectable.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2021
    • Like Like x 4
  2. driverwoods#1787

    driverwoods#1787 Well-Known Member

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    Modern Era because DB BR642 & 643 is used in the Aschaffenburg area just like this route.
     

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