1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Db Br 14.2 Question

Discussion in 'PC Discussion' started by Amax, Jan 19, 2021.

  1. Amax

    Amax Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2020
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    179
    hi I have a question about the db br 146.2 that means on the speed storyteller on the right where the Kn is the following numbers 10 20 30 40 60 70 knowing that the db br 146.2 has 300 kn
     
  2. solicitr

    solicitr Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2020
    Messages:
    4,511
    Likes Received:
    6,418
    kiloNewtons: the amount of power the motors are drawing. US and UK locos read current in amperes instead.
     
  3. Callum B.

    Callum B. Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2018
    Messages:
    935
    Likes Received:
    1,627
    Some of the newer North American locomotives, such as the AC4400CW, read in Klb (kilo pounds), which is functionally equivalent to Kn, except in imperial terms.

    Cheers
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. kalteVollmilch

    kalteVollmilch Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2018
    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    432
    Did I understand your question correct: You want to know why the tractive effort indicator only goes up to 70KN, when a 146.2 is supposed to have 300KN?

    Answer:
    The tractive effort indicated is the tractive effort of one traction motor, of which the 146.2 has four. You can see this on the cab display, where is it labeled: "Zugleistung pro FM" (or something similiar). FM is the abbreviation for "Fahrmotor" (again, I believe. Could be a different word, but would have the same meaning). Translate this into english and you get "tractive effort per traction motor".
    So therefore 4 * 75KN = 300KN and everything is well :)
     
    • Like Like x 3
  5. Amax

    Amax Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2020
    Messages:
    140
    Likes Received:
    179
    Thank you so much:)
     
  6. Quentin

    Quentin Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2016
    Messages:
    174
    Likes Received:
    152
    For those not familiar, 1 pound (force) is around 4½ Newtons, or 10kN = 1 (long) ton. I remember this as a Newton being approximately the weight of an apple. :)
     

Share This Page