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General Vocabulary

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by danjoda755, Aug 31, 2019.

  1. danjoda755

    danjoda755 Member

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    I intend this to be a topic of conversation, not a provocation, but I am curious....
    I see a consistent tendency of using British terminology in American operations. Some examples are:
    Signalman (Brit) vs Tower Operator or dispatcher (LIRR).
    "Stable" a train vs "Lay-up" (LIRR)
    Preparing a train for service is a "put-in" in my MTA experience.
    Any NEC specialists care to contribute?
    Again, I find my fellow drivers of all lands to be brothers and sisters on the rails, this is just about different conventions on different roads
     
  2. -PjM-

    -PjM- Well-Known Member

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    I suppose because DTG is a British company there might be a tendency to slip into using some of the terms used "over here". It's fascinating how our common language deviates over time (and distance).

    I often wonder what the literal translation from the German terminology is. Is it the British or American words, or something different again.

    Here's a couple of others for your list. I'm sure I'll think of more.
    Points / Switches
    Shunting / Switching


    Actually creating a list might be useful. Especially for those that don't know some of the terms.
     
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  3. Big Papi34

    Big Papi34 Well-Known Member

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    It amazes me how both countries speak common English yet so many words are different, pronounced different, etc.
     
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  4. thearkerportian

    thearkerportian Well-Known Member

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    Some translations from German can be fairly funny indeed.

    PZB. Punktförmige Zugbeeinflussung. "Point-shaped train interference." Point shaped meaning, only active at the physical point where one of the magnets is installed. As opposed to (the not yet implemented in TSW):
    LZB - Linienzugbeeinflussung, "linear train interference" active along the entire length of the track.
    Something else that wants to stop you of course, is the Sifa - Sicherheitsfahrschalter. "Fahrschalter" is a throttle selector, Sicherheit means safety (or security in other contexts) Hence, "Safety throttle lever." It's nothing of that sort from a technical standpoint, of course.

    And then there's the notorious BR of course - Baureihe. "manufacturing series", literally. Which is just our word for class, series, etc.

    Maybe I'll find a few more nice ones. :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2019
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  5. -PjM-

    -PjM- Well-Known Member

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    Tomaato, tomarrto. :)

    Although it can cause some confusion luckily we generally understand what each other means.

    I think I'll stick to PZB! But as I said it's interesting to see the direct translation. I suppose translations of technical systems/words into German also cause some humour.
     
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  6. thearkerportian

    thearkerportian Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely. Cab car comes to mind. "Kabinenwagen." Cabins? You mean compartments? It's not a ship mate, it's a... oh wait you refer to driver's cab. The brid... eh... the cockp... eh... Grrr just stop it already :D

    And for sake of completeness, we call it a Steuerwagen. "control car". A carriage from which the locomotive is controlled.
    Maybe I'll post a list/glossary of German railway vocabulary, as I wouldn't be surprised if TSW is many a railfan's first encounter with the intricacies of German railroading. Languages are just as much a hobby of mine as are trains, so that might actually be fun and a little useful at the same time.
     
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  7. -PjM-

    -PjM- Well-Known Member

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    For even more completeness then we call them DVTs Driving Van Trailer.
     
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  8. thearkerportian

    thearkerportian Well-Known Member

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    Right, these exist too. Though the "van" part only says it's a luggage car or did I get that wrong?
     
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  9. -PjM-

    -PjM- Well-Known Member

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    The DVT just has luggage space (due to rules for high speed trains I think) but we do have the Driving Brake Standard Open (DBSO) that are converted from carriages and do have passenger spaces. Confusing!
     
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  10. thearkerportian

    thearkerportian Well-Known Member

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    Confusing? You won't say that once you saw Germany's carriage desegnation letters. DABpzfa767.0 anyone? :p
     
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  11. danjoda755

    danjoda755 Member

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    Thank you for adding more depth and humor to this topic, greatly appreciated I'm okay with the romance languages, but useless with German.
     

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