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Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by richard cooper, Mar 18, 2019.

  1. richard cooper

    richard cooper Member

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    I know this is a generalisation with so many engines, but roughly how far from a station or stop should I throttle down and apply brakes, and incrementally brake to stop at the required part of platform. Any help would be appreciated.
     
  2. MYG92

    MYG92 Well-Known Member

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    It depends on the type of train in term of length, weight, if it's uphill or downhill etc so many parameters but if you're a beginner I suggest you to start braking 1.5 kilometers before your stop
     
  3. Digital Draftsman

    Digital Draftsman Well-Known Member

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    There's no simple answer as it depends on the type of vehicles, the speed, the weight, the gradient, the weather etc.

    With passenger operations you want to use as little brake as possible and always bring the train to a halt with the lowest brake setting, this is to ensure that passengers don't get knocked off their feet with a sudden stop.

    On the Class 166 in GWE, you have notches 1, 2 and 3 of brake (plus emergency). You should avoid using notch 3 in normal operation, just use 1 and 2. Ideally you'd apply notch 1 at a point where the train will come to a stop perfectly in the station, but that takes a lot of skill. It's usually encouraged to start with notch 2 of brake and then move down to notch 1 if you're losing speed too quickly, but either way, ensure you move to notch 1 before the train comes to a complete stop. Good train handling usually means braking harder intially and then releasing the brake as you lose speed. You also want to avoid "fanning the brake" which is releasing and applying the brake multiple times in short succession.

    The best way to practice is to use a landmark, say a signal or bridge, apply notch one and see if the train stops before or after the platform. If you end up stopping short you know next time to wait until you've passed that signal or bridge before braking. It's ultimately about learning the route, which is exactly what drivers need to do in reality.

    So have fun and practice!
     
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  4. richard cooper

    richard cooper Member

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    Thank you , that really is helpful
     
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  5. Dave Mel

    Dave Mel Well-Known Member

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    i always try to be doing about 25-20 mph when entering a station on Gwr. on german or american routes i usually aim to enter stations around 30 mph because i find them to be longer. Then again it all depends what you have onboard, passengers, goods. and also take into mind what brakes you are using, train brake, direct brake, electric brake. in this game practise makes perfect
     
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  6. Xilixir

    Xilixir Active Member

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    just learn your train. may take few services but it all depends on you actually
     
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  7. byeo

    byeo Well-Known Member

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    Learning is half the fun, especially in the Class 43 HST when stopping at Slough for example and you overshoot and have to reverse...
     
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