Jōban Line | Shinagawa - Toride

Discussion in 'Suggestions' started by Commiee, Oct 2, 2021.

  1. Commiee

    Commiee Well-Known Member

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    An E233-2000 series EMU north of Kashiwa Station on the Jōban Line (photo by Suikotei/CC BY-SA 4.0)

    With this proposal, I am suggesting a route that has a few characteristics setting it apart from my previous ones. Firstly, the Jōban Line features low-rise urban surroundings, which offer sights that are somewhere between the super-metropolitan look of the Keiyō Line skylines and quiet suburbs of Chūō West. Secondly, the rolling stock on this line is mostly composed of long sets of up to 15 cars, which adds a different commuter experience and feel to my other proposals. And the rolling stock here is, on average, more modern than on my three existing commuter suggestions, creating a rather contemporary look for the line. What is more, there seems to be more information on this line compared to many others online, potentially making it easier for prospective developers to gain insight into it.

    I hope you like this one as much as I do - watch the beautifully set-up and laid-out tracks and trackside sights in the cab video below, take a look at the diverse rolling stock, and imagine what a delightful experience it would be to drive this on TSW2.

    The route

    Originating at Shinagawa, 6.8 km (4.2 mi) south of Tokyo, this section of the JR East-operated Jōban Line navigates through the capital and then proceeds north-east to reach Toride, stretching over a distance of 50 km (31 mi). The rest of the line eventually connects the capital city with the Tōhoku region. The first sections of the overall line were built between 1889-1905. Coming under nationalisation in 1906, the line went under the process of electrification starting in 1936. Shinagawa and Tokyo joined the rest of the line after the opening of the Ueno–Tokyo Line in 2015. The name of the Jōban Line was formed from parts of the names of the former provinces of Hitachi and Iwaki.

    The Shinagawa - Toride section features Local, Rapid and Special Rapid services in addition to Hitachi and Tokiwa limited express runs. The Local services use the Tokyo Metro Chiyoda Line for through running, while Rapid trains transport passengers between either Shinagawa or Ueno on the one end, and Toride as the other terminus. The Special Rapid services - serving the line outside rush hours - proceed around 26 km (16 mi) further and terminate at Tsuchiura. The Tokiwa Limited Express starts at Shinagawa before proceeding past Toride and to Iwaki - about 220 km away from the departure station - while the Hitachi service goes even further and reaches Sendai, more than 370 km from the origin point. In this proposal I am including both Local and Rapid services, but not the limited express ones, as their stopping pattern and the long distance of the full route they are designed for mean it would be a massively incomplete experience to limit them to this section only.

    There are 22 stations between Shinagawa and Toride. Between Nippori (fourth stop out of Shinagawa) and Ayase the line is double-tracked, with the subsequent section between Ayase and Toride being quadruple-tracked. The typical Japanese narrow 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in) gauge and 1,500 Volt DC electrification with overhead catenary serve the section, along with the ATC signalling used for the Ayase-Toride part and ABS used for the rest of the line. For control, the ATOS system is used between Ueno (the station after Tokyo) and Hatori (beyond the section I'm proposing) as well as for local trains between Ayase and Toride. The CTC system governs the remaining parts.

    Notable sites and locations along the section include:
    • The Shimbashi Station, one of the oldest railway stations in Japan, dating back to 1872
    • Outside the Matsudo Station: the Tojogaoka Historical Park - the location of the family home of Tokugawa Akitake of the shogun family
    • Outside the Kita-Matsudo Station: the Matsudo Velodrome racetrack, where oval racing events on two wheels are hosted
    • Outside the Minami-Senju Station: a temple and burial ground commemorating the area where the Tokugawa shogunate executed criminals in the Edo period between 1650 and 1873
    • Outside the Ayase Station: the Higashi Ayase Park, a metropolitan recreational area built on a former paddy field. The park has a flower garden, sports facilities, and other amenities

    A cab view journey between Ueno (three stops after Shinagawa) and Toride on an E231 series Rapid service EMU

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    From left: the route runs north-east from the Tokyo area; the route in a wider geographical context (via rome2rio.com); route map with stations between north-east of Tokyo and Toride (by RailRider)

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    A station schematic of services between Shinagawa and Toride (by nabechansky)

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    From left: Platforms 9 and 10 of the Shinagawa Station (photo by Toshinori baba/CC BY-SA 4.0); a view of the Ueno Station (photo by Wpcpey/CC BY-SA 4.0); platforms 3 and 4 of the Ayase Station (photo by Mister0124/CC BY-SA 4.0); a Kameari Station platform (photo by Nesnad/CC BY 4.0); platforms 1 and 2 of the Kashiwa Station (photo by Mister0124/CC BY-SA 4.0); a view of a Toride Station platform (photo by くろふね/CC BY 3.0)

    The rolling stock

    The line boasts a very diverse selection of current and past trains, however I will limit the list below to the ones that run on the Shinagawa – Ueno – Iwaki section. This excludes both the commuter EMUs servicing sections beyond Toride, and limited express trains of the Tokiwa and Hitachi services. As always with information on Japanese routes, there might be newer models also running on the line that were not mentioned in sources I looked at - we often have to deal with that caveat.

    The Local service stock operating on the line is the E233-2000 EMUs, Tokyo Metro 16000 series and Odakyu Electric Railway 4000 series. The E231-0 is used on the Rapid service. As the significant history of the line would suggest, these trains (and other EMUs not included in this suggestion as they travel beyond Toride) replaced a substantial fleet of former rolling stock for both commuter and rapid services at different points over the recent decades.


    A look at various interior sections of the E233-2000, including the cab (through the bisection of the driver compartment) and the carriage

    The E233-2000 replaced the 203 series and 207-900 series formerly used on the line, and is a narrow-body sub-variant of the E233. They have been used in 10-car sets since 2009, with the final set delivered in 2017. That year, the line had 19 sets of these trains, based at Matsudo Depot. Built by Tokyu Car Corporation and J-TREC, 190 vehicles were constructed between 2009-2011 and in 2017. Made of stainless steel, these EMUs feature four pairs of doors on each car per side. The parent E233 variant can reach a top speed of 120 km/h (75 mph), has the IGBT-VVVF traction system, ATS-P, ATS-SN, ATC and Digital ATC safety systems as well as regenerative brakes.


    A 16000 series EMU arriving at and departing from the Shim-Matsudo Station

    The Tokyo Metro 16000 series was built by Hitachi and Kawasaki Heavy Industries between 2010-2012 and 2015-2017, with 370 vehicles produced. Deployed from the Ayase Depot in 10-car sets, they can reach a top speed of 110 km/h (68 mph) from 3,280 kW power output. Constructed from aluminium alloy, they use the single-arm pantographs, CS-ATC and Odakyu D-ATS-P safety systems, and pneumatic and regenerative brakes.


    A collection of shots of the Odakyu 4000 series on Jōban Line

    The Odakyu 4000 series was built between 2007-2016 by Tokyu Car Corporation, J-TREC and JR East, with 150 vehicles constructed of stainless steel. Similarly to the E233-2000, they were designed in narrow bodies for facilitating their use on subway lines. In 2016, 15 sets were in use in 10-car configurations. Capable of reaching 100 km/h (60 mph), the train is equipped with OM-ATS and CS-ATC safety systems, IGBT traction system and regenerative brakes. The 4000 series are based at Kitami Depot.


    Details of a Rapid service 15-car set E231-0 EMU

    Replacing a range of ageing EMUs, the E231-0 sub-variant of the E231 EMU was built between 2000-2006 by Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Tokyu Car Corporation and JR East. The train is a common sight across lines in Japan, with 725 constructed and then undergoing refurbishment between 2014-2020. Made of stainless steel, the train uses IGBT-VVVF traction system, ATS-P, ATS-SN and D-ATC safety systems and can reach 120 km/h (75 mph). Regenerative and pneumatic brakes are part of the hardware on the EMU.

    Former rolling stock

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    From left: 401 series EMU (photo by spaceaero2/CC BY-SA 3.0); 103 series Rapid train on Jōban Line (photo by シャレー女苑 -/CC BY-SA 4.0); 103-1000 series EMU on the line (photo by シャレー女苑/CC BY-SA 4.0); 403 series train (photo by spaceaero2/CC BY-SA 3.0); 207-900 series EMU at the Matsudo Station (photo by まも/Public Domain); 203 series EMU on Jōban Local Line (photo by Sui-setz/Public Domain); 415-1500 series EMU (photo by Cfktj1596/CC BY-SA 4.0); 209-1000 series train entering the Kanamachi Station (photo by MaedaAkihiko/CC BY-SA 4.0)

    Sources:
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Jōban_Line
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Hitachi_(Japanese_train)
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Tokiwa_(train)
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Shimbashi_Station
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Matsudo_Station
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Kita-Matsudo_Station
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Minami-Senju_Station
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/E233_series
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Tokyo_Metro_16000_series
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Odakyu_4000_series
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/E231_series
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Matsudo_Velodrome
    https://japantoday.com/category/features/travel/matsudo-an-old-post-town-with-plenty-of-history
    https://tokyo-eastpark.com/higashiayase/higashiayase-en
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2021
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  2. fabdiva

    fabdiva Well-Known Member

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    Just as a slight clarification. JR East run all the Joban local services, with trains being handed over to Tokyo Metro (with crew change) at Ayase (though for fare purposes services from the Joban line run under JR fares to Kita Senju but the underground part of Kita Senju is Tokyo Metro run)

    With Through running the trains operate as a common pool with each company contributing trains to the mix - but legally and operationally a service changes operator at the boundary between companies. So an Odyaku set would be handed over to Tokyo Metro at Ayase with a Tokyo Metro crew taking it forward, then at Yoyogi-Uehara the train is handed over to Odyaku and one of their crews, the following train may be a JR set and will follow the same process.

    Why do I mention this - well if Odakyu and Tokyo Metro approve then you can include their stuff and realistically be working it as a "JR Driver" on the Joban line
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2021
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  3. Commiee

    Commiee Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for this - I reworded the first paragraph of the rolling stock section. I hope the rest is accurate - if not, I would be grateful for any further corrections/additions from anyone.
     
  4. zefreak

    zefreak Active Member

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    Good suggestion, I would be happy with any of your Japanese route proposals, It's surprising that there have been no asian routes at all. I own all of the TS classic Japanese routes, and would love to see the region modeled in TSW
     
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  5. Commiee

    Commiee Well-Known Member

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    Thank you - I put in a lot of effort in these (stayed up until 7am to complete this last one, hah), so to see people like them is satisfying. I would also love to see basically any suggested route that we have in the Japanese master list become a reality, especially once we also have multiplayer. Imagine running services along with other enthusiasts of Japanese rail - what would be more awesome than that?
     
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  6. Commiee

    Commiee Well-Known Member

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    Adding a JR East route map PDF that includes the line:

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  7. Commiee

    Commiee Well-Known Member

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    A map showing electrification modes of different sections of the line, in addition to other notes. This is for the entire Joban Line, with my proposed section to Toride highlighted in green + the darker colour line that follows from Tokyo to south, to the edge of the map:

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    Source
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2021
  8. vulkan

    vulkan New Member

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    I would love it if they added this route to TSW, especially if using former rolling stock which some of them are still running in my country, Indonesia:D
     
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