Jr East: Yamanote Line

Discussion in 'Suggestions' started by LativaBoy, Jan 24, 2020.

  1. LativaBoy

    LativaBoy Active Member

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    The Yamanote Line (Japanese: 山手線, Hepburn: Yamanote-sen) is a railway loop line in Tokyo, Japan, operated by East Japan Railway Company (JR East). It is one of Tokyo's busiest and most important lines, connecting most of Tokyo's major stations and urban centres, including Marunouchi, the Yūrakuchō/Ginza area, Shinagawa, Shibuya, Shinjuku, Ikebukuro, and Ueno, with all but two of its 29 stations connecting to other railway or underground (subway) lines.

    As an official line name, "Yamanote Line" indicates the tracks between Shinagawa and Tabata via Shinjuku that are used by local trains on their own tracks as well as the parallel Yamanote Freight Line which is used by Saikyō Line and Shōnan-Shinjuku Line trains, some limited express services, and freight trains. However, in everyday usage, the "Yamanote Line" refers to the entire 34.5 km loop line served by local trains.
    [​IMG]
    Map of the Yamanote Line (light green)
    Rolling Stock:
    As of January 2020, the line's services are operated exclusively by a fleet of 50 11-car E235 series EMUs, the first of which was introduced on the line on 30 November 2015. However, a number of technical faults, including problems with door close indicators, resulted in the train being taken out of service the same day. The E235 series returned to service on the Yamanote Line on 7 March 2016.

    Prior to the E235 series, the line's services are operated by E231-500 series EMUs, which were in use from April 21, 2002, to January 20, 2020. These trains originally each included two "six-door cars" with six pairs of doors per side and bench seats that were folded up to provide standing room only during the morning peak until 10 a.m. From February 22, 2010, the seats were no longer folded up during the morning peak, and all trains were standardized with newly built four-door cars by 31 August 2011. This was due to reduced congestion on the line as well as preparation for the installation of platform doors on all stations by 2017.

    The E231 series supported a new type of traffic control system, called digital Automatic Train Control (D-ATC). The series also had a more modern design and has two 15-inch LCD monitors above each door, one of which is used for displaying silent commercials, news and weather; and another which is used for displaying information on the next stop (in Japanese, English, Korean and more) along with notification of delays on Shinkansen and other railway lines in the greater Tokyo area. The E231-500 series trains were based at Tokyo General Rolling Stock Centre near Ōsaki Station.

    [​IMG]
    E235 series

    [​IMG]
    E231-500 series


    My Opinion:
    I feel that the Yamanote Line would be a good fit for Train Sim World and a good start to introducing Japanese routes to the game. With the Yamanote Line being one of the busiest commuter lines, it would add some challenge in scenarios keeping on schedule. There are many other Japanese routes I would suggest for TSW, but I think the Yamanote Line would be a good way for TSW to start diving into Japan seeing as it plays a key role in Tokyo's commuter service.
     
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  2. BigMountain555

    BigMountain555 Well-Known Member

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    I have been dreaming of this but I am quite sure it will never come to either Train Simulator nor Train Sim World. The World in TSW seems to stand for USA, UK, and Germany. Heck, there is no World in the Train Simulator name, yet even that has a very limited number of countries. The vast majority of routes are UK, USA, and Germany. I wish they would spread this around a bit more. Yamonote line is a fun line to ride. It would have to be very detailed as it goes through the built-up heart of Tokyo.
     
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  3. fabdiva

    fabdiva Well-Known Member

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    I'd love to see this, though I'm also mindful of the practicality. Yamanote trains only would make the route feel very empty, you could add the trains on the parallel stoppers as driveable DLC at a later date. The Shinkansens would probably have to remain off limits to the player unless you just want to drive them one stop!

    Other issue is dealing with all the JRs, The Yamanote is run by JR East, But the parallel Shinkansens are run by a mix of JR East, Central and West. There are also private railways in the mix.

    One thing I am wondering is if the platform edge barriers can be toggled, that way a new player doesn't have to worry so much about lining up, when they get to a more advanced level they can toggle the barriers on for a new challenge in lining up with the doors.

    Still would love to see this one made :D
     
  4. fabdiva

    fabdiva Well-Known Member

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    Found this view of a lap



    Yep without all the AI on the neighbouring lines it'll feel very empty.
     
  5. jamesbaby286

    jamesbaby286 Well-Known Member

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    In my opinion that's why its preferably not the first line in the Tokyo area to be made. So you can make a line that shares the same trains with areas of the Yamanote Line first, before doing the Yamanote Line so the other traffic can be present. Yamanote is definite must though.

    Probably a line that runs the E233 series would be good since that stock covers multiple lines that run parallel with parts of the Yamanote Line.
     
  6. Commiee

    Commiee Well-Known Member

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    I came across this today:

     
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