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Northern Transpennine - How It's Changed

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by lcyrrjp, Mar 20, 2019.

  1. lcyrrjp

    lcyrrjp Member

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    For those enjoying the Northern Transpennine route, this is a very interesting video showing how it looks today.

    What is particularly interesting to me is how much the railway has changed, while the world surrounding it has changed so little.

    Line speeds are generally significantly higher, particularly around stations. Bowling out of the tunnel and into Stalybridge at 50mph, where we are used to doing 15mph, is quite unnerving.

    Signalling has changed beyond all recognition.

    Some stations have closed - either still stood and derelict, or vanished without trace - and others have opened.

    Track layouts have in most cases been simplified - but in some cases been made more complex.

    Train tracks have gone - and tram tracks have appeared.

    Really worth a watch:

     
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  2. 37114

    37114 Active Member

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    One thing that hasn't changed, Manchester is still a horrible place.
     
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  3. lcyrrjp

    lcyrrjp Member

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    Obviously whether you like a place or not is a matter of individual preference and depends what you're looking for. Personally I quite like Manchester. Along with Leeds, and indeed most UK cities, it has had a lot of investment and is vastly improved since the 1980s, reflecting the UK's economic success during that time.

    Few places, in the UK or abroad, look at their best from the train. The presence of the railway itself (and associated noise) does not help land values immediately alongside the line. Travelling into London on the Great Western I often think what on earth visitors to the city who landed at Heathrow must be thinking as they look out of the window at the far from flattering first impression. There are exceptions though - what better way to admire Durham or Newcastle than from the train?
     
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  4. LastTrainToClarksville

    LastTrainToClarksville Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for this interesting video; I'll admit immediately that I only watched the first five minutes. What caught my attention most was the amount of trash and clutter in the vicinity of the tracks, because the total lack of such in TSW and TS is what makes them look so unrealistically sterile, plus the immaculate passenger platforms. Would adding just a modicum of dirt and clutter lower frame rates? If so, how about a clutter slider?
     
  5. londonmidland

    londonmidland Well-Known Member

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    To put it simply, placing down additional assets wouldn’t hurt the frame rates in any significant way.

    We have previously been told that the lack of 2D trees placed is because it has a significant impact on frame rate. Which is quite frankly a load a bull.

    The real reason why we often get sparse scenery is because the developers often run out of time by the time the deadline is here and management do not care what state the route is in.

    So it is essentially forced out in an unfinished state, with the ‘essentials’ having only been complete.

    We have seen this happen time and time again, and I don’t see things changing unless management change their policies.
     
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  6. 37114

    37114 Active Member

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    You know this as a fact or is it just your opinion?
     
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