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Ntp Class 45 Vs Class 40?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by SHINO BAZ, May 21, 2019.

  1. SHINO BAZ

    SHINO BAZ Member

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    NTP has the class 45 which is a great loco,but the freight packs also adding the class 40 loco,which is also looking good.But they look about the same(which is great i love the short hoods on both of them)but just wondering what makes them different then each other?
     
  2. Jez

    Jez Active Member

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    Class 40 is 2,000hp and made by English Electric and fitted with an EE engine. Dual braked (originally vacuum only), steam heat.

    Class 45 is 2,500hp and built at Derby and Crewe works. Fitted with a Sulzer engine. Dual braked, electric heat (45/1) or steam heat (45/0).

    They both have the same wheel arrangement. Class 40 has a longer bonnet. They sound very different. Have different grilles etc.

    There's more to it but you get the idea.
     
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  3. ARuscoe

    ARuscoe Well-Known Member

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    Best option is go to wikipedia and look up "BR class" followed by whatever it is you want. Every class of UK train is on there
     
  4. SHINO BAZ

    SHINO BAZ Member

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    Well if both can haul passenger carrages or freight wagons i'll be happy.
     
  5. ARuscoe

    ARuscoe Well-Known Member

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    As referred to... go to wikipedia

    The Class 40s operated in all areas of British Railways although sightings in the Western and Southern Regions have always been exceptionally rare and usually the result of special trains and/or unusual operational circumstances. After the early trials, the majority were based at depots in northern England, notably Manchester Newton Heath and Longsight, Carlisle Kingmoor, Wigan Springs Branch, Thornaby and Gateshead.

    The heyday of the class was in the early 1960s, when they hauled top-link expresses on the West Coast Main Line[12] and in East Anglia. However, the arrival of more powerful diesels such as Class 47 and Class 55, together with the electrification of the West Coast Main Line, meant that the fleet was gradually relegated to more mundane duties.

    [​IMG]
    40013 (without nameplates) at Manchster Piccadilly
    In later life the locomotives were mainly to be found hauling heavy freight and passenger trains in the north of England and Scotland. As more new rolling stock was introduced, their passenger work decreased, partly due to their lack of electric train heating (D255 was fitted with electric train heating for a trial period in the mid-1960s) for newer passenger coaches. They lost their last front-line passenger duties – in Scotland – in 1980, and the last regular use on passenger trains was on the North Wales Coast Line between Holyhead, Crewe and Manchester, along with regular forays across the Pennines on Liverpool to York and Newcastle services.

    Throughout the early 1980s Class 40s were common performers on relief, day excursion (adex) and holidaymaker services along with deputisation duties for electric traction, especially on Sundays between Manchester and Birmingham. This resulted in visits to many distant parts of the network. It would be fair to say that few routes in the London Midland and Eastern regions did not see a Class 40 worked passenger service from time to time. Regular destinations included the seaside resorts of Scarborough, Skegness and Cleethorpes on the Eastern region, with Blackpool and Stranraer being regularly visited on the West Coast.

    Much rarer workings include visits to London's Paddington and Euston stations, Norwich, Cardiff and even Kyle of Lochalsh. The fact that 40s could turn up almost anywhere resulted in them being followed by a hard core of bashers, enthusiasts dedicated to journeying over lines with rare traction for the route.

    The Class 45s became the main traction on the Midland Main Line from 1962, and their introduction allowed considerable acceleration of the previous steam-powered service. The Class 45s remained the main source of power on the Midland Main Line up to 1982, when they were relegated to secondary services following introduction of HSTs on the route. From 1986 Class 45s virtually disappeared from the line.[2] From the early 1980s until their withdrawal c.1988, the class were regular performers on the North Trans-Pennine line working services from Liverpool Lime Street to York, Scarborough or Newcastle via Manchester Victoria, Huddersfield and Leeds. These trains were usually formed of early Mark 2 carriages, of up to seven in a typical train.
     

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