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St Pancras Dlc Trains

Discussion in 'Suggestions' started by mark.bolter, Sep 15, 2020.

  1. mark.bolter

    mark.bolter Member

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    Being as we have St Pancras on the roadmap I thought it would be nice if we could have the old faithful run on that line as a DLC loco
     

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  2. fabdiva

    fabdiva Active Member

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    Not sure St Pancras to Kentish town in an HST would be much fun. At the moment it's just the High Speed side of St Pancras planned
     
  3. Luke8899

    Luke8899 Well-Known Member

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    Well once GWR preserved collection is in you can create an off the rails scenario and take a HST down HS1 to Faversham from St. Pancras. Admittedly it's not accurate in the slightest and might look even more odd than it already is being in GWR livery but technically you're going to get something approximating what you have suggested.
     
  4. mark.bolter

    mark.bolter Member

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    Sorry I’m a bit confused,I thought the class 43 was classed as high speed...or am I missing something
     
  5. Northerner

    Northerner Well-Known Member

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    The 'High Speed' side of St Pancras is where the domestic services along HS1 run. The HSTs depart from the Midland Mainline side of the station.
     
  6. fabdiva

    fabdiva Active Member

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    Yep, MML side has UK signalling speeds in MPH, AWS and TPWS. The High Speed and International side uses UK Signals, with the French KVB safety system and Speeds are in km/h.

    The KVB choice was future proofing for stock from the continent. No point in requiring AWS for the final km to the buffers when leaving the TVM Cab signalling. 374s for example do not have AWS/TPWS (as they don't fit on the UK network outside HS1) - work has recently been done to fit Ashford with KVB so 374s can stop there. KVB comes as part of the TVM package so 395s are also fitted.

    It's not possible to run directly between the MML and HS1 parts of the station, there is a connection for track maintenance but it requires a reversal.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2020
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  7. Lightspeed

    Lightspeed Member

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    How does the French KVB safety system work then? Is it similar to how German PZB and LZB work?
     
  8. fabdiva

    fabdiva Active Member

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    From what I can understand it's a bit like TPWS, if the train is slightly overspeed for the upcoming signal it'll sound a warning for the driver to increase braking, and if they don't respond or the overspeed is to great it'll hit the emergency brake. The speed limits for it to alert or intervene are calculated based on the trains length and weight. Information about the signal is transmitted to the train though a Balise placed between the rails. I'm not sure if the AWS equivilent ("Crocodile") is fitted at St Pancras as well.


    There is a non functioning KVB unit in the TS Classic 395 and a working one in the TGVs
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2020
  9. dasmith1

    dasmith1 Member

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    EMR class 43, 222 and 221 would be good to have either in the old livery or new livery to Corby, Nottingham and Sheffield. Could appear on the Roadmap whenever DTG decide to add the locos and routes from St Pancras.
     
  10. Northerner

    Northerner Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I'm pretty sure it's similar to what the British Automatic Train Protection (ATP) was like which enforces a braking curve on the approach to decreases in speed, if the curve is not met within a certain margin then the brakes will apply. ATP wasn't ever widely fitted in Britain as it wasn't considered value for money for each life saved so they used TPWS instead which is cheaper but doesn't have as many features.
     

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