U-bahn Berlin Linie U5 (berlin Hbf - Hönow)

Discussion in 'Suggestions' started by Jo_Kim, May 14, 2021.

  1. Jo_Kim

    Jo_Kim Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
    Wikipedia Article
    This is the U-Bahn Berlin, the oldest and largest subway in Germany. To keep up the tradition of the brown coloured subway lines in TSW I'll present the U5. With over 20km in length, the U5 is the second longest line on the U-Bahn network. Including the just recently opened section between Alexanderplatz and Hauptbahnhof, the U5 connects many important points in the city centre with the outside boroughs in the east. Important stations along the line are: Hauptbahnhof (central station), Bundestag (Parliament), Brandenburger Tor (icon of Berlin and the German reunification), Alexanderplatz (major hub in central Berlin), and Frankfurter Allee (connection to the Ring S-Bahn).

    Quick Facts:
    Length: 22,4km
    Max. Speed: 70km/h
    Track Gauge: 1435mm (Normal Gauge)
    Third-Rail Voltage: 750V=
    Signaling System: H/V modified (details below)
    Safety System: (no details could be found about the current system) | CBTC (planned)

    Route:
    [​IMG]
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    Stations:
    Distance | Station | Change (S- & U-Bahn)
    00,0km Hauptbahnhof S3 S5 S7 S9
    00,9km Bundestag
    01,8km Brandenburger Tor S1 S2 S25 S26
    02,4km Unter den Linden U6
    03,0km Museumsinsel
    03,7km Rotes Rathaus
    04,0km Alexanderplatz S3 S5 S7 S9 U2 U8
    04,6km Schillingstraße
    05,4km Strausberger Platz
    06,3km Weberwiese
    06,9km Frankfurter Tor
    07,6km Samariterstraße
    08,4km Frankfurter Allee S41 S42 S8 S85
    09,2km Magdalenenstraße
    09,9km Lichtenberg S5 S7 S75
    11,1km Friedrichsfelde
    12,3km Tierpark
    14,2km Biesdorf-Süd
    15,3km Elsterwerdaer Platz
    16,7km Wuhletal S5
    18,1km Kaulsdorf-Nord
    19,0km Kienberg (Gärten der Welt)
    19,8km Cottbusser Platz
    20,5km Hellersdorf
    21,4km Louis-Lewin-Straße
    22,4km Hönow

    Rolling Stock:
    Similar to the London Underground, the U-Bahn Berlin has two different profiles. Lines U1 to U4 are of the Kleinprofil type (small profile), whilst U5 to U9 are of the Großprofil type (large profile). Except for the IK-class the trains are built for either one of the two different profiles but other than the Underground these are not bound to a specific line.

    F74E | F76E
    These are the first generations of the famous F-class. These were modernized and therefore have an E added to their designation (E = ertüchtigt ⇒ upgraded).
    [​IMG]
    F84 | F87 | F90 | F92

    These are the more modern versions of the F-class. With a completely new traction system, modern passenger doors and various other changes these are quite different from the older generations.
    [​IMG]
    H95 | H97 | H01
    Being the first trains after the reunification the H-class hauled the U-Bahn into the new millennium. Since the very first prototype runs the H-class can be found on the U5.
    [​IMG]
    IK17 | IK20

    Originally built for the Kleinprofil, some IKs were modified with gap bridges for services on the Großprofil. Both modified generations of the IK-class run on the U5.
    [​IMG]
    J22
    The newest generation of trains was supposed to enter services this year, but this was delayed to next year. The new J-class has many similarities with the IK-class but is also the first new Großprofil train in 20 years.
    [​IMG]

    Signaling System:
    The signals are based on the H/V system found on the national rail network, but with some additions for more details. Since most aspects are identical to the normal H/V system, I will just show the main signal aspects here.
    The U5 has some minor signalling differences from the rest of the U-Bahn network. The most severe are that all signalling aspects from and to sidings have to be treated as Hp4 and the signal designations differ from all other lines.
    Hp0 (Stop):
    2021-05-14 06.57.27 berliner-u-bahn.info be9e9f0078d0.png
    Hp1 (Clear):
    2021-05-14 06.57.38 berliner-u-bahn.info 6d33c7531650.png
    Hp2 (Slow 40km/h):
    2021-05-14 06.57.47 berliner-u-bahn.info a8bd73628337.png
    Hp3 (Slow 25km/h):
    2021-05-14 06.58.23 berliner-u-bahn.info 77d64eb548df.png
    Hp4 (Occupied 25km/h):
    2021-05-14 06.58.33 berliner-u-bahn.info 9dfd3d69a0e0.png
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2021
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  2. saltychipz#3569

    saltychipz#3569 Well-Known Member

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    Very detailed suggestion , I hope this is added . Just out of interest how long did this thread take to put together ?
     
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  3. driverwoods#1787

    driverwoods#1787 Well-Known Member

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    Very detailed post Here and I'm wondering if these U-Bahn Trains have Sifa installed? In addition to U-Bahn specific train safety systems like the tripcock arm and the future CBTC system.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2021
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  4. Jo_Kim

    Jo_Kim Well-Known Member

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    They have a SiFa installed, but it's a simplified version. You just have to push down a button there is not timing involved. Sadly I have only found websites that talk about old safety systems on the U-Bahn but not any about the modern one. I expect this system is similar to other safety systems found on U-Bahn and Stadtbahn systems around Germany: It only monitors the max. allowed speed indicated by light signals, so there are no braking times, no acknowledgement of signals and no safety that a train will stop before a red signal.
    This might seem quite unsafe, but subways generally have greater tolerances in their signalling systems and due to the rather low speeds and high braking performance, driving on sight is much easier on these systems than on the national network.
     
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  5. lukas#1835

    lukas#1835 Active Member

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    Very Detailed suggestion
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2021
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  6. creeperblox2710

    creeperblox2710 Well-Known Member

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    Aka called the Deadman Switch also isnt it like the one on the 1972 Stock?
     
  7. Jo_Kim

    Jo_Kim Well-Known Member

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    The function is similar but the implementation is different. On older rolling stock the switch must be operated by hand and is not integrated into other controls, whilst on newer rolling stock it is a foot pedal.
     
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