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Us Vs Uk Terminology Differences

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Olaf the Snowman, Apr 23, 2020.

  1. Olaf the Snowman

    Olaf the Snowman Well-Known Member

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    Left is the US term and Right is the UK equivalent. Please note that I am generalising so I know some of the terms below are interchangeable particularly number 3 and 5.

    1. Dispatcher/Signaller. To confuse things, Dispatcher has a different meaning in the UK.
    2. Marker lights/tail lights (red light(s) at rear of train). Again to confuse things, marker lights is a term used for UK trains albeit with a different meaning.
    3. Throttle/Notch
    4. Independent brake/Straight air brake
    5. Dynamic/rheostatic or regenerative
    6. Track/Platform
    7. Conductor/Guard
    8. Engineer/Driver
    9. Alerter/Driver Safety Device and Driver Vigilance Device
    10. Railfanning/Trainspotting
    11. Approach/Caution
    12. Interlocking/Junction
    13. Head-end power or Hotel power/Electrical Train Supply
    14. Truck/Bogie
    15. “Dee-Pot”/“Dep-Ot” pronunciation
     
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  2. JohnnyK98

    JohnnyK98 Active Member

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    Nice list! I've been using these interchangeably without realizing.
     
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  3. -PjM-

    -PjM- Well-Known Member

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    And of course Switch/Point - Switcher/Shunter - Switching/Shunting.

    And maybe Car/Wagon? Or even Cabcar/Driving trailer (or DBSO!)
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2020
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  4. stujoy

    stujoy Well-Known Member

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    Train station/Railway station

    Anybody in the UK who calls a railway station a train station is seriously speaking out of turn and ought to be shunned.
     
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  5. -PjM-

    -PjM- Well-Known Member

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    Fixed. ;)
    That wouldn't work with American terminology!
     
  6. JJTimothy

    JJTimothy Well-Known Member

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    Not convinced by this one. I'd certainly call it a throttle but some throttles are notched. One might speak of notching up meaning going going up to the next notch.

    They tend to be called conductors here as well. Be interested to know who is to blame for this.

    There's an important distinction to be drawn between trainspotters and rail enthusiasts. I am interested in trains but have never felt the urge to stand on platforms in all weathers counting them.

    Indeed. What's wrong with "station" though?
     
  7. Olaf the Snowman

    Olaf the Snowman Well-Known Member

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    I did say they are interchangeable but regardless, I stick by what I’ve said. Throttle is not generally used in the UK certainly not in modern day. In fact, I haven’t heard that term used for a very long time or maybe if talking about the old locomotives. “Taking power” is another phrase but not throttle.

    The Guard’s role is called a Guard as per rulebook. Company’s working instructions may vary including conductor, senior conductor, train manager, guard and commercial guard. But the job is a guard. The rulebook calls it a guard. The union calls it a guard.
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2020
  8. stujoy

    stujoy Well-Known Member

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    Just saying “station” is also good.
     
  9. LastTrainToClarksville

    LastTrainToClarksville Well-Known Member

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    I've also seen "wagon" spelled "waggon" -- any notion of where the double g comes from?
     
  10. -PjM-

    -PjM- Well-Known Member

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    Yes I've also seen that. I associate the double G more with waggon trains crossing the wilds of America more than the railway trains variety. :)
    I could be wrong though!
     
  11. Railmaster

    Railmaster Member

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    Waggon is german, Wagon a variety. It means a kind of car- a Wagen.
     
  12. matthew.lee.02

    matthew.lee.02 New Member

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    I’m not quite convinced that the alerter is the same as the DSD or DVD. The DSD has to be kept depressed throughout operations and is reset by briefly lifting it. It is foot operated. The alerter is hand operated and is reset with a button or lever. Though to a lesser extent, it is a bit like calling the AWS the UK equivalent for the ATC which isn’t quite right. Just my opinion
     

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