Victorian Goldfields Railway

Discussion in 'Suggestions' started by maxthum, Oct 26, 2020.

  1. maxthum

    maxthum Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2020
    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    184
    Back with another route proposal but this time, this is something that could be nice to launch steam trains.

    The Victorian Goldfields Railway is a 17 km (10.6 mi) long route, following the former Victorian Railway's Maldon Branchline. 1,600 mm (5 ft 3 in) in gauge, would make it one of the first broad gauge lines seen in the TSW universe.

    The Route
    The route, being 17km which has 3 stations along the way, this route will be another trip like West Somerset Railway. This route traverses from Castlemaine Station, into the bushes, and onwards to the heritage town of Maldon. This line takes roughly around 45 mins to traverse, with a max speed of 25mph.

    http://www.vgr.com.au/maps/vgr_map.pdf

    [​IMG]









    Important Key Notable Places:
    A few key notable places of interest would be:

    Castlemaine Station
    [​IMG]

    Castlemaine Station acts as the gateway to the VGR, for many starting points of the trip towards Maldon and back into time, a time of yesteryear.

    The depot is also here, servicing the locomotives and able to turn them around for Funnel First (FF) trip back to Maldon.

    Maldon Station
    [​IMG]
    The terminus of the line, this is the end of the line where passengers spend time at Maldon to experience the heritage town.

    The depot is also here, servicing the locomotives and able to turn them around for Funnel First (FF) trip back to Castlemaine.

    Locomotives / Diesel Multiple Units

    Taken from the VGR website.

    K Class 2-8-0

    With the introduction of the C Class 2-8-0 heavy freight locomotives in 1918, plans were prepared for a similar but lighter axle load general purpose locomotive capable of operating over branchlines laid with 60lb rail. These locomotives were to replace aging 0-6-0 units and supplement the DD Class. 10 'K' Class locomotives were constructed at Newport Workshops during 1922 - 23 (Nos. 100 - 109) The design proved successful with the locomotives employed on both branch and main line duties. They could be turned on 53' turntables and operate virtually anywhere on the Victorian system. Although limited to a maximum speed of 40 miles-per-hour, their higher tractive effort than the DD Class made them particularly suitable for branchlines with steep grades.

    In 1923 an agreement on rail gauge standardization was reached, and the decision taken that future locomotives would be suitable for conversion to standard gauge (4' 8½). Both the C & K class locomotives were unsuitable for conversion. Yet, during the Second World War an acute shortage of locomotives lead to the construction of a further 53 locomotives to the "1922" K class design between 1940 and 1946. Some minor improvements were incorporated in this series, with the final seven locomotives being fitted with balanced Boxpok coupled wheels.

    The members of the original batch of K class locomotives were renumbered, becoming Nos. 140 - 149. The second series carried Nos 150 - 192 from new. During the 1950's the maximum speed for the class was raised to 50 miles-per-hour.

    K 160
    [​IMG]
    K 160 has been in regular service since 1986 on the VGR.

    J Class 2-8-0

    Post Second World War revitalization of the Victorian Railways included an updated design of the K Class. The Vulcan Foundry in England built 60 "J" Class locomotives, these units entering service in 1954. Incorporating many of the basic specifications of the K's, these locomotives were constructed for easy conversion to standard gauge. Like the K, these units were available for the entire VR system, could be turned on 53' turntables and were permitted a maximum 50 miles-per-hour. 30 units (Nos500 - 529) were coal burning and 30 units (Nos530 - 559) were oil burning.

    The J Class proved to be the last class of steam locomotive to enter service on the Victorian Railways. They quickly displaced the aging D2 and D3 4-6-0 locomotives on branchline duties.

    J 549
    [​IMG]
    Has been named 'Brian Frewin'

    J 549 was in regular service until May 2004 when it was withdrawn to permit new tyres to be fitted to the engine wheels. The wheels have been retyred and the engine is back on its wheels. The smoke box has been removed in preparation for fitting of a replacement.



    F 212
    [​IMG]
    F 212 is serviceable and regularly used on works trains, demonstration trains and charter passenger workings.

    T Class Diesel Electric (Bo-Bo)
    Introduced to replace aging steam fleet units on branch line service, 27 units were built by Clyde Engineering Co. Pty. Ltd. of Sydney. A similar unit was purchased by the VR from the Portland Cement Co., in 1969 and converted from 3'6" to 5'3". ( Nos. 320 - 346 & 413). Several batches of similar locomotives with varying upgraded features increased the fleet to a total of 94 units with an additional 5 "H" class units having an increased axle load and low speed controllers for Melbourne yard hump shunting. The "T" Class units were available for use on all VR lines as well as performing main line duties on both passenger and freight work with a maximum speed of 60 mph.

    A distinguishing feature of the first series T is the cab being the same height as the hood body, thus they frequently described as 'flat top t's'.

    T 333
    [​IMG]

    Y Class Diesel Electric (Bo-Bo)
    Y 133
    [​IMG]
    Y Class - Ex Victorian Railway Diesel-Electric Bo-Bo Locomotive. A total of 75 Y Class units were built between 1963 and 1968. These 65 tonne 485 / 559kw units were powered by GM 2 stroke diesel engines, utilising refurbished Melbourne Electric Train bogies. This unit is in VR Blue & Gold.

    To conclude, this would be a wonderful addition to TSW if it's possible.
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2020
    • Like Like x 5
  2. jamesbaby286

    jamesbaby286 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2018
    Messages:
    277
    Likes Received:
    434
    Fantastic proposal! Very well detailed. The goldfields are such a rich source of history and significance in Victoria and Australia.

    The fact it has a good amount of diesels means it's doable within this current steam-less generation of TSW.
    Including the Australian version of the british Gronk I am sure would attract quite a few curious minds!

    Added to the Australian proposals list:
    https://forums.dovetailgames.com/th...o-the-land-down-under.2393/page-2#post-196744
     
  3. maxthum

    maxthum Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2020
    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    184
    Thanks! It's been a quick one to whip up with this proposal. Kinda enjoy West Somerset Railway so this would make a great addition.

    About the F Class.
    upload_2020-10-27_0-23-4.jpeg
    Reminds me of this, which was done back in Railworks days... shame this never really got to see it's real potential. Came with broad gauge tracks and everything.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. pogboyw21

    pogboyw21 New Member

    Joined:
    May 24, 2021
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    8
    I’ve only been to this railway once but I do think it could go far in Train Simulator, it’s not a long route but if the mainline was added and you could run heritage trains and modern V/line services, that would be so good.
     
  5. driverwoods#1787

    driverwoods#1787 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2021
    Messages:
    4,519
    Likes Received:
    2,545
    Excellent Idea and for the F Class locomotive, DTG can make it by regauging the existing Class 08/09 WSR TVL GWML Diesel Legends DLC NTP from 1.435m Standard Gauge to the 1.6m Irish Gauge.
     
  6. OldVern

    OldVern Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2020
    Messages:
    3,348
    Likes Received:
    4,772
    Nice presentation, agree it would make for something a bit different and very pleasant to drive.
     

Share This Page