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World Creation

Discussion in 'PC' started by KiwiLE, Jan 9, 2019.

  1. KiwiLE

    KiwiLE Active Member

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    Hi All,

    I didn't know where to put this but I have a very noob question (so be gentle)!

    Are the buildings, signals, locos and stock in TSW created in Blender?
    How are the animations handled, horn movement, window dropping, lights etc on locos and stock?

    I saw from youtube that there are some rather fantastic looking locos done with the software. Also a Blender to Unreal4 engine export tool which is good news.

    I used to use Blender for non-train stuff but admit I'm rusty now ;)
     
  2. TrainSim-Steve

    TrainSim-Steve Staff Member

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    Hi KiwiLE,

    All content for Train Sim World is created in 3ds Max (models and animations), which is standard across the games industry. However, that's just the tool that we use and Blender is perfectly suitable as a replacement for 3ds Max if that's what you're used to.

    Hope this helps.

    Best, Steve
     
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  3. KiwiLE

    KiwiLE Active Member

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    Hi TrainSim-Steve,

    Thanks for your time and reply.

    Is there a minimum render you prefer on models or does the U4 engine handle all that side? A loco made from squares vs the BigBoy modelled on youtube for example?

    I wish I had the time! I can just see that shunting 101's into Man Vic....lovely.
     
  4. TrainSim-Steve

    TrainSim-Steve Staff Member

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    Hi KiwiLE,

    I'm not sure what you mean by "minimum render", could you explain more about what you're referring to?

    Best, Steve
     
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  5. Tomas9970

    Tomas9970 Well-Known Member

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    I think that he want's to know what is an approximate polycount on a loco and how many LODs does it have.
     
  6. 37114

    37114 Active Member

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    Or you can't afford 3DS Max!
     
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  7. KiwiLE

    KiwiLE Active Member

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    Yeah, this! And I love the idea of paying $0 per month too heh :)
     
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  8. Juxen

    Juxen Active Member

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    I use Inventor 2018 for my job (mechanical engineer), and now Fusion 360 (free for hobbyists) at home, and import files to 3dsMax/Blender, then go to UE4. I just cannot use 3ds or Blender after using an actual CAD system.

    If you want a "free" system, and you have the know-how to work in a CAD system, I'd highly recommend using Fusion 360, then Blender, to get a file into Unreal 4.
     
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  9. Juxen

    Juxen Active Member

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  10. Tomas9970

    Tomas9970 Well-Known Member

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    Here are the sites that I use:
    https://texturehaven.com/ has a lot of CC0 photoscanned PBR materials available with no registration.
    https://www.textures.com/ after registration allows you to download 15 textures every day for free however it's limited to 1024x1024 resolution.
    Raster blueprints on https://www.the-blueprints.com/ are free and vector blueprints are paid. Requires registration to get the full resolution.
    https://pixabay.com/ is the most popular CC-0 library of pictures. It requires registration to get full resolution and to remove Captcha.
     
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  11. KiwiLE

    KiwiLE Active Member

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    This is great thanks, people.
    So texturing is all done by importing the samples into the Unreal engine editor and not in Blender?

    I saw an excellent series on youtube at
     
  12. Juxen

    Juxen Active Member

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    I think you can bring in textures from Blender, but it's usually just easier to import something into Unreal 4, then tweak it as needed. I get cautious about importing anything other than base models from one system to another, as the lighting codes in each program can be vastly different.
     
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  13. KiwiLE

    KiwiLE Active Member

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    Hmm yes, thanks for that. Doing that stuff in the UE4 editor seems to be simple but can
    I ask how much texture will hurt FPS if you go the whole hog on brickwork etc? I get the need for fewer triangles in the model, just not used to detailed texture yet.
     
  14. Juxen

    Juxen Active Member

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    If you create each brick as an individual model (I tried that once. Killed a 64-GB RAM computer.), it will be incredibly resource-intensive. If you use PBR textures, the only real hit is in how detailed (512x512 vs 2048x2048 for instance) the textures are. As far as I understand how PBR's work, it's kind of like they're still a 2D texture, but have a kind of cheat-sheet built in to tell a computer how the light reacts and reflects off of its surface, tricking the eyes into thinking it's 3D. In a conventional 3D program, the logic is:

    Model --> Texture --> Light --> Lighting code and resources calculate how the textures and models will work when hit with light.

    In a PBR, it's more of:

    Model --> PBR Texture --> Light --> Lighting code is told by PBR texture what it will look like, depending on light angle. The PBR takes the calculation out of the equation (heh) by coming up with how it will look beforehand.

    I could be wrong, of course, but that's how I see PBR's working. I think the biggest resource drain is in the size of the texture itself, not the PBR behind it.
     
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  15. Tomas9970

    Tomas9970 Well-Known Member

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    Texture does not hurt performance much if you set the right texture compression. You should use normal maps and AO maps to get the detail. There is also another way by using parallax shader but that is quite resource intensive.
     
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  16. Tomas9970

    Tomas9970 Well-Known Member

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    Actually there are several textures in a PBR material and most of them are grayscale. The biggest resource drain is the shader itself.
     
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