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Bd Br 185.2 Nbü/eu Switch

Discussion in 'PC' started by Nicholas, Dec 12, 2018.

  1. Nicholas

    Nicholas New Member

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    Does anybody know what it does? I’ve tried to do my own research but I don’t speak German! I was curious if it was anything like the MU headlight controls in a Geep.
     
  2. ProfCreeptonius

    ProfCreeptonius Well-Known Member

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    Greetings!

    NBÜ stands for Notbremsüberbrückung. There are different procedures and depending on the state the process varies. In general, the driver or the train is permitted to reject or delay an emergency or penalty brake application if the train is in a danger zone. In Germany danger zones are marked with Hektometertafeln with red stripes on bottom and top. If the train is in such a region, either it itself or the driver knows that no emergency brake applications may occur in that region. This is to prevent trains from getting stuck on bridges, tunnels, sharp curves, etc. Last thing one wants is a passenger to pull the emergency brake handle due to a fire, the train to stop and everyone be trapped on a narrow bridge or in a deep tunnel. This means that all tunnels, in particular on RT, but also on RSN are considered danger zones and the train MUST be able to whiz out of there if necessary (fire, smoke, flood?, whatever).
    This is just a brief overview over how that exactly works, but I hope I could give you an idea of the concept. This, of course, is not simulated.

    Cheers,

    EDIT: This is also what the mysterious 'PZB Bridging' button on RT does in reality - denies PZB penalty brakes in tunnels. On the 185 it's just called NBÜ.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2018
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  3. Nicholas

    Nicholas New Member

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    Very informative! Thank you, kindly. I assumed whatever the parameter was, it wouldn’t be simulated. It’s aleays nice to know your loco a bit better, though!!

    Cheers
     
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