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How & When To Brake Properly In Bakerloo Line?

Discussion in 'PlayStation Discussion' started by johnathonmanner, Sep 8, 2020.

  1. johnathonmanner

    johnathonmanner New Member

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    Can anyone give me some tips here on like how to do a proper station stop? I just purchased this game a week ago and I pretty much got the basic train operation stuff down but entering and stopping at stations seem to be my problem. The train brakes work very good but there are times when I would overshoot or not fully bring the train all the way to the marker. Thanks.
     
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  2. matjamca

    matjamca Well-Known Member

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    You just have to keep practicing. Especially now with adhesion physics it’s not easy to give guidance as so many factors can influence. I generally apply notch 1 brakes as I leave a tunnel or arrive at the edge of a platform and then judge my speed halfway along the platform, either increasing my braking or leaving it as is. I rarely use brake notches 3 or 4, but I have needed to use them.
     
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  3. johnathonmanner

    johnathonmanner New Member

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    Thanks for the reply, usually I come into stations at either 20mph or 25 mph and using Rheo hold 1 (I believe that’s what it’s called) and will apply small amounts of braking force mid way to the station and let it coast all the way to the marker. It’s usually when I get overground and the speed limits increases to 30mph and beyond is where I come into issues judging when to apply brakes.
     
  4. Luke8899

    Luke8899 Well-Known Member

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    Judging by the timetable and how difficult it is to keep up with it, my approach is to come into the station full pelt or near enough and then apply the brakes hard-ish, with the option to coast and apply again if necessary. That and starting the closing the doors sequence when the passenger loading is around 80% done has been the only way I've been able to keep on schedule. The overground stations are the hardest to fathom because you want to take the same approach as a normal train and either end up stopping 15 meters too soon or you end up 2 minutes behind schedule before you've even made it to a tunnel.

    It's been a while since I have been on the tube in real life but it was never uncommon to me that the brakes were applied hard and late by the drivers, I've ended up in enough armpits to remember that bit of the "unique" experience of London's transport. Certainly standing at the end of the platform in Oxford Circus as the Victoria or Central lines trains came in at what felt like full speed was always quite terrifying. Also in real life under-runs are not particularly unusual either, many's the time you can stare at the doors wondering why they don't open only for the train to suddenly jump forward 2 meters, although to be fair I encountered this mostly on the Victoria line after it was upgraded to automatic train operation.
     
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  5. ZeenozPlays

    ZeenozPlays Well-Known Member

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    I used to only use Notch 1 braking at 25 coming into stations, until I noticed that I was coming into stations late. It’s all about judgement. You can easily stop the train at the end of the platform at 40 MPH if you can judge how much braking you need for the speed in which you are going.
     
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  6. byeo

    byeo Well-Known Member

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    You can easily enter a platform doing 25-30 mph and stop without overshooting. The brakes on the 72 Stock are very good, like others have said, it's all trial and error. Take a look at this video (not all Bakerloo Line), the trains enter the platform at a decent speed, watch out for the very fast approach at around 1:55, it can be done.

     
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  7. DTG Natster

    DTG Natster Community Manager Staff Member

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    johnathonmanner

    I am currently a bit rubbish at breaking myself! Everyone I see playing makes it look so easy, but I have been told by the community that practice is the best way to improve.

    I am sure you will be an expert in no time.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2020
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  8. TheTipsyRaccoon

    TheTipsyRaccoon Active Member

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    You always want to come in too cautiously and underrun and have to nudge up over having an overrun.

    Can confirm tube trains are meant to be driven quite aggressively, network rail start braking about 3 light years outside the station, but on the tube they can often motor right up to the tail end of the platform and still stop on the mark with no worries. On the Northern line it used to be coast until about half way down the platform and then full brakes. Those things stopped SO well.
     
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  9. ChewChew

    ChewChew New Member

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    Hey this is one question I’ve been working on all week! I created a scenario between two stations that has mostly flat track (wembly central and Harlsden), then I’d speed up to max and then record the stopping distances.

    Remembering that there’s many factors that affect braking distance (rail adhesion, slope, train weight, wind resistance, and whether you are accelerating or maintaining speed when you first put on the brakes, to name but a few) here’s what I found in ideal conditions:

    Brake 1 is about 0.6 m/s
    Brake 2 is about 0.8-0.9 m/s
    Brake 3 & 4 are about 1.4 m/s

    Why is this important? Well from what I’ve read passengers have trouble standing unassisted on a train decelerating at more than around 1.0 m/s. So using brake 3 or 4 makes your passengers grab onto something to keep them upright (but isn’t so crazy as to make them fall over).

    Unfortunately the timetable is pretty tight and if you want to keep up you usually have to use Brake setting 3.

    Starting at 45 mph and using brake 1 it would take you ~33 seconds to pull up over a distance of 350 yds. Using Brake 2 would be ~22 seconds, and Brake 3/4 would be ~14 seconds, and those time savings quickly add up after multiple stations!

    So to answer your question; start braking a bit before the following distances using Brake setting 3:

    45 mph - 150 yds
    40 mph - 125 yds
    35 mph - 100 yds
    30 mph - 75 yds
    25 mph - 50 yds
    20 mph - 35 yds
    15 mph - 25 yds

    Do you see the pattern? Easy to remember when driving! (150 yds at top speed, reduce by 25 yds every 5 mph slower). Especially easy to judge since a platform is about 150 yds long.

    Just remember, like a formula 1 driver changes his brake point depending on the car and track conditions, you will too :)
     
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  10. ChewChew

    ChewChew New Member

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    Here's a graph I made of the braking curves. The little 'tick marks' on the lines represent time intervals in seconds.
     

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  11. kylel2036

    kylel2036 Well-Known Member

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    I didn't think that this would have a whole math explanation but this is a interesting topic
     

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