Keiyō Line | Tokyo - Soga

Discussion in 'Suggestions' started by Commiee, Sep 15, 2021.

  1. Commiee

    Commiee Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2021
    Messages:
    245
    Likes Received:
    253
    [​IMG]
    A Keiyō Line 205 series EMU crossing the Shiomi Canal on the route (photo by ykanazawa1999/CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

    My suggestions so far have all been located away from the Tokyo metropolitan hub. I thought for some time about proposing a line that connected to the capital. But we already have a lot of suggestions with Tokyo playing a part, so I was not sure if there was need for another one. Then, several elements came together a few weeks ago that prompted me to decide on submitting this suggestion:
    • My former original proposal of the Shōnan Limited Express featured the E257 EMU, but after I decided to replace that suggestion, none of my active proposals had that train. I learned some weeks ago that some of the recently refurbished E257-2000s (redesignated as E257-5000) were last month introduced to the Sazanami Limited Express service on this line, so here was an opportunity to feature the train again. Additionally, the Keiyō has 209 and E233 commuter EMUs, which feature in a number of route suggestions by other people, so I thought having another proposal with them could mean that the trains could be re-used by the devs in the future, shortening development time for them.
    • The line has heavily urbanised surroundings, crosses a few canals en route, runs close to the coastline, and much of it is on elevated tracks. This all means that both drivers and passengers have a view that's different from many other suggested routes. You can see some of these iconic Japanese city skylines and general urban look in the cab view below.
    • Even though there are other suggestions featuring Tokyo, if DtG/third party devs decide to do a Japanese route for TSW2, some routes might be more feasible than others, and some may not be viable at all, so there is still a point in having more suggestions. This line is significantly shorter than most suggestions - and all three of my previous proposals - which could be one reason that makes its potential implementation more practical.
    With that intro - which is also a kind of nutshell overview of the line's pros - out of the way, I will lay out the details of the suggestion below.

    The route

    Operated by JR East, the 43 km (27 mi)-long Keiyō Line forms a part of an unclosed Tokyo Mega Loop around the capital. The Keiyō is the southeastern section of the loop and connects to the Musashino Line that takes the loop northward, before it arcs to the west and around the city. Administratively, the line is a link between Tokyo and the Chiba Prefecture to the east. In 2015, Keiyō Line services transported around 714,000 passengers daily.

    The first section of the line opened in 1975 to connect the Chiba Freight Terminal and Soga Station freight yard over a 6.5 km (4.0 mi)-long route. The Keiyō was initially intended to be used exclusively by freight. Passenger services were added on a part of the line in 1986 and extended in both directions two years later to reach Soga to the east and Shin-Kiba - located 7.4 km (4.6 mi) outside Tokyo - to the west. Shin-Kiba was connected to the capital in 1990, completing the line. A year later, Sazanami and Wakashio Limited Express services were rerouted to start using the Keiyō Line as part of their journey between Tokyo and Tateyama, further bolstering the number of passenger services using it.

    Services now operating on the line include Local and Rapid trains, commuter rapid, limited express, and Musashino Line rolling stock. They stop at, or pass through, 18 stations between Tokyo and Soga, some located underground. When departing from Tokyo, the first three stations - Tokyo, Hatchōbori and Etchūjima - are underground, meaning a ride of about six minutes before trains emerge to street level. The route runs on the 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in) gauge typical for Japan, with 1,500 Volt DC electrified overhead catenary and a maximum speed limit of 100 km/h (62 mph). The depot in Narashino is the one used for the line.

    Notable locations served by the line include:
    • The Tokyo Disney Resort and the Makuhari Messe fairgrounds
    • The Makuhari planned town near the Kaihimmakuhari Station. The town has been distinguished with Japan's Good Design Award, which recognises high-quality planning, architecture, design and services
    • The Kasai-Rinkai Park near the station named after it. This municipal recreational area features the Diamond and Flower Ferris Wheel, Tokyo Sea Life Park and a bird sanctuary

    A cab view video of a rapid train journey on the Keiyō Line, between Tokyo-Soga (starts at 0:37)

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    From left: the Keiyō Line (in red) and connected lines of the Tokyo Mega Loop (by RailRider); a map of Keiyō Line stations (by RailRider); list of stations featured (via Wikipedia)

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    From left: Shin-Kiba Station platforms (photo by Nesnad/CC BY 4.0); Shin-Urayasu station platform (photo by 甲武/CC BY-SA 3.0); platform of Ichikawashiohama Station (photo by DAJF/CC BY-SA 3.0); platform of Nishi-Funabashi Station (photo by Mister0124/CC BY-SA 4.0); a view of Shin-Narashino station (photo by MaedaAkihiko/CC BY-SA 4.0); platforms of Soga station (photo by Mister0124/CC BY-SA 4.0)

    The rolling stock

    The following may not be a complete list of rolling stock for all services, as many sources seem not to be up-to-date (e.g. the full list of current Sazanami and Wakashio Limited Express rolling stock). However, even the trains that can be confirmed seem to comprise a diverse choice of consists on the line, especially if one also factors in options from the past rolling stock.
    I will skip naming the EMUs of the Musashino Line services running through the Keiyō Line, as they only partially use the line. The resulting selection comes down to two current trains of the Keiyō Line itself, plus two Sazanami service trains that I have been able to confirm from Japanese sources. I will list some technical details for these four EMUs of the current fleet, while mentioning former trains afterwards only by model names.

    The current EMUs of the Keiyō Line are the 209-500 series and the E233-5000 series, while the Sazanami Limited Express service uses the E257-500 and E257-5000 EMUs, the latter being a recently refurbished variant of the E257-2000.

    Commuter rolling stock


    The 209-500 trains started operation on the line in fall-winter of 2008, after their transfer from the Keihin-Tōhoku Line. The EMUs have been used in 10-car setups on the Keiyō Line. In service on Japanese routes since 1998, and part of the wider 209 series EMU model, the variant was intended as a stop-gap before the E231 series, which are identical to the former in many regards. The 209-500s were built until 2000, with 170 cars constructed in total. Around 100 of these were still in service in recent years, with the trains also undergoing refurbishment between 2016-2019 (resulting in a replacement of their traction systems, a switch from GTO-VVVF to IGBT-VVVF). These EMUs are formed in either eight- or 10-carriage sets, and are equipped with ATS-P, ATS-SN, ATC and Digital ATC safety systems. Also featuring regenerative brakes, the series have a power output of 1,520 kW and can reach a top speed of 110 km/h (70 mph). They are are manufactured by Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Tokyu Car Corporation and JR East.


    In 2010, the Keiyō Line also received the E233-5000 series EMUs, which led to the retirement of the previously used 201 and 205 series trains (the 209-500s had also replaced some of these EMUs with their arrival). These are a variant of the E233 series manufactured by Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Tokyu Car Corporation, J-TREC and JR East. Constructed in Niitsu, 240 cars of the 5000 version were built between 2010-2011, with around the same number in operation in recent years. These electric units are formed from four, six or 10-carriage sets. They can reach a top speed of 120 km/h (75 mph), have the IGBT-VVVF traction system and ATS-P, ATS-SN, ATC and Digital ATC safety systems as well as regenerative brakes.

    Limited express rolling stock


    An E257-5000 series EMU. The train is used for the Sazanami Limited Express service on the line. The service then proceeds to Uchibō Line and Tateyama

    The recently refurbished E257-5000 series EMU of the Sazanami Limited Express began operating on the service - using the Keiyō Line before proceeding to Uchibō Line and ultimately Tateyama - in August 2021. The refurbishment (from the E257-2000 series) resulted in installation of destination displays and new interior decorations on the train, as well as slight changes to their luggage racks (source) and a change of the colour of livery elements from blue to green. The variant originates from the E257 series, which first entered service in 2001 and has spawned a total of six variants (E257-0, E257-500, E257-2000/2500 and E257-5000/5500). Nearly 250 vehicles have been built since production started at Hitachi, Kinki Sharyō and Tokyu Car Corporation factories. These trains serve on around 10 different lines in Japan. Capable of reaching a top speed of 130 km/h (80 mph), they are equipped with IGBT-VVVF traction system and ATS-P and ATS-SN safety systems. The refurbished E257-5000s have been seen operating in 9-car sets on the Sazanami service, which mostly runs in summer.


    An E257-500 series EMU used on Sazanami Limited Express service since 2004

    The E257-500 series entered service in fall of 2004 on Sazanami and Wakashio services. These sub-series replaced the 183 series trains, with the EMUs based at the Makuhari depot. Beside the Keiyō/Uchibō lines, they were used on Sotobō, Sōbu Main and Yokosuka lines in the recent years. Also in recent years, some of the sets were in queue for conversion into E257-2500 series, for use on Odoriko Limited Express service, which runs on Tōkaidō Main Line.

    Former rolling stock

    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    From left: former EMUs of the Keiyō Line: 103 series set 303 at Chiba-Minato Station (photo by DAJF/CC BY-SA 4.0); 165 series Shuttle Maihama (photo via A Train of Thought blog); 201 series at Shiomi Station (photo by Rsa/CC BY-SA 3.0); 205 series set No. 8 (photo by basser/CC0); E331 series set AK1 (photo by とく@Twingoな日々/CC BY-SA 2.1 jp)

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    From left: former EMUs of the Sazanami and Wakashio Limited Express services: 183 series Sazanami express C2 formation (photo by Linearcity/CC BY-SA 3.0); 255 series Limited Express Sazanami (photo by Nanashinodensyaku/CC BY-SA 4.0)

    Sources:
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Keiyō_Line
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Sazanami_(train)
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Wakashio
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Kaihimmakuhari_Station
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Kasai-Rinkai_Park_Station
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/209_series
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/E233_series
    https://www.wikiwand.com/en/E257_series
    https://www.jreast.co.jp/e/routemaps/sazanami_wakashio.html
    https://train-fan.com/e257-5000-rollout
    https://train-fan.com/e257-5000-debut
    https://www.g-mark.org/about/
    https://www.socimi.it/209-500-series-keiyo-line
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2021
    • Like Like x 11
  2. zefreak

    zefreak Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2021
    Messages:
    64
    Likes Received:
    115
    I would love to play this
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. driverwoods#1787

    driverwoods#1787 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2021
    Messages:
    2,715
    Likes Received:
    1,618
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2021
  4. Commiee

    Commiee Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2021
    Messages:
    245
    Likes Received:
    253
    Adding an official JR East route network PDF that includes the Keiyō Line (in dark red near the bottom-right section):

    [​IMG]
     
  5. fabdiva

    fabdiva Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2019
    Messages:
    577
    Likes Received:
    554
    The passenger stuff on the Keiyo is Single Voltage - The AC/DC boundary is further to the North - The Joban line uses Dual Voltage stock (as does the Tsukuba Express) but that's down to avoiding interference with a major lab between the two routes. For other lines the AC/DC boundary is well to the North of Tokyo
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. Commiee

    Commiee Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2021
    Messages:
    245
    Likes Received:
    253
    While I was researching sources on the line, I checked the JRF page and it looks like they list freight service in the area as part of the Musashino Line only, however jamesbaby286 has told me there is freight traffic between Futamatashimmachi and Soga. In the end, I decided to skip mentioning freight altogether in the suggestion, even though having it would obviously make it more appealing to players who like freight. Do you know any sources I can check for more details?
     
  7. antwerpcentral

    antwerpcentral Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2021
    Messages:
    457
    Likes Received:
    401
    Yup, I want this route
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Dinosbacsi

    Dinosbacsi Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2017
    Messages:
    1,201
    Likes Received:
    2,064
    A really nice route, I love how pretty much all of it is elevated. And the usual JR commuter trains that everyone loves, I'm in.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Raynebow

    Raynebow New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2021
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    Another in favor, if DTG could ever get a license with JR. Alternatively, give Union Workshop dev partnership for for TSW2. Particularly given the upcoming Tohoku Shinkansen.
     
    • Like Like x 1

Share This Page