Please Help

Discussion in 'PlayStation Discussion' started by andrew698, Jul 1, 2021.

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  1. andrew698

    andrew698 New Member

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    hi guys, can you explain to me what these switches are / tell me when to use them, thanks (i refer to br182)

    • train line
    • Main circuit breaker
    • Traction motor fan
    • Air compressor
    • Nebu switch
    • Multiple units methods
    • Pzb mode u/m
    Thanks again
     
  2. Lamplight

    Lamplight Well-Known Member

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    Controls whether the loco provides head-end power to the rest of the train. Basically: If it's on, the coaches have power for lights, destination boards, and so on. In the sim, you don't really need to mess with it. If you want to be safe, just flick it into start and let it return to on afterwards.

    The main circuit breaker for the locomotive. If it's off, the loco can't draw power from the overhead catenary. You won't need to mess with it unless you're either cold starting the loco or trying to power it down.

    The control switch for the cooling fans for the traction motors. Leave them in automatic - no need to mess with them.

    The control switch for the air compressor filling up the main reservoir which is used for braking, horn, raising the pantographs, etc. Always leave it on.

    It's something to do with overriding the passenger emergency brakes for tunnels and the like. Definitely no need to mess with this.

    There are different systems for controlling multiple locomotives from one cab in Germany. This switch determines which protocol is used if you've got two locos hooked together. It's just decoration in the sim, it has no effect.

    Determines the PZB mode the locomotive uses: O or M or U. If you want to learn more about PZB, consult one of the TSW manuals for a German route or check out these English PZB instructions.
     
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