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Tsw2 London Underground Speed Changes

Discussion in 'PC Discussion' started by Richard Kast, Jun 16, 2020.

  1. Richard Kast

    Richard Kast New Member

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    Will the Bakerloo line speed changes reflect London underground rules i.e. front of train passing not rear?
     
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  2. byeo

    byeo Well-Known Member

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    I’d like to think so and hope it’ll be true to real life but having a feeling it’ll be one of those things they miss out. Please prove me wrong DTG..
     
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  3. Dinosbacsi

    Dinosbacsi Well-Known Member

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    Good question. Hopefully it works like it's supposed, but well we will see.
     
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  4. Anthony Pecoraro

    Anthony Pecoraro Well-Known Member

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    I don't understand.
     
  5. doc_woods

    doc_woods Active Member

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    On the London Underground, if you're going from a low speed limit to a higher one you can speed up as soon as the front of the train passes the speed limit sign. You don't have to wait for the whole train to pass it.

    This is different from all the other routes in TSW. Therefore the question was whether this is simulated correctly.
     
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  6. LimitedEdiition

    LimitedEdiition Well-Known Member

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    I don't think this is really that big of a deal to be honest. It's not like the game prematurely ends once you start accelerating early. If you turn the points scoring system off and the external speedometer off, you wouldn't even notice anything "wrong" either.
     
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  7. Plastic Pal

    Plastic Pal Well-Known Member

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    You could take that approach with every single aspect of simulation. Does the Bakerloo Line actually have to have trains? Or stations? If the player gets to sit on a deck-chair watching a simulated sea splashing on a the beach, then wouldn't that be enough for a train simulator....?

    More seriously.... this would actually have a very large impact on high fequency services.... if there are a large number of speed limits (usually at junctions) on the route. Every single second counts.

    I am trying to remember my personal experience of walking through the Bakerloo Line tunnels..., and I don't recall there being many speed restrictions at all. There were TSRs (and I might have placed them there myself.....)....

    In short - if this is poorly simulated (or not simulated) in the game, then I don't think the impact will be very high. But this would be different on the Central Line, where the trains are exceptionally torquey...
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2020
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  8. Anthony Pecoraro

    Anthony Pecoraro Well-Known Member

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    Why were you walking through the tunnels...?
     
  9. Paulo_1997

    Paulo_1997 Active Member

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    Either he is a constructioner or crazy :D
     
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  10. Plastic Pal

    Plastic Pal Well-Known Member

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    To answer your question.... I am an engineer. In the early part of my career I managed installation works on nearly every single part of the London Underground network. This included tube recon (reconditioning of sleepers and pit blocks), re-railing, electrical works including works to the power supply (like supervising welding crews for juice ramps), full prep-work for signalling crews, plus major installations top-side, such as complete re-alignment of major junctions..... I have walked through pretty much every tunnel on the LUL network.

    If DTG make a DLC for the Bakerloo Line that includes battery locos and flats.... then I think I might actually send their Chatham Office three crates of Krispy Kremes (x144 doughnuts per crate).
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2020
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  11. Plastic Pal

    Plastic Pal Well-Known Member

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    Or.....

    .... I could be both.... ;-)
     
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  12. Paulo_1997

    Paulo_1997 Active Member

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    Classic example of "overqualified" :D
     
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  13. byeo

    byeo Well-Known Member

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    Not that you quoted me but my father used to work for a company who maintained the London Underground network at nights, WAY before the night tube became a reality. Part of the job requires you to do walks along the lines making sure there’s no loose nuts/bolts or any damage to track.

    Whatever the reason, people do walk the tracks for one reason or another.
     
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  14. Doomotron

    Doomotron Well-Known Member

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    Plastic Pal have you seen any ghosts down there?

    Asking for a friend.

    OK, I'm just asking for myself.
     
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  15. Plastic Pal

    Plastic Pal Well-Known Member

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    In a "tube" tube....no.... It's quite a predictable environment. And usually the tubes are quite well lit in engineering hours (which gives you a clue that the juice is off). Nowhere near as spooky as you might expect. Although underground siding roads are a bit weird, because they snake off into pitch black, with maybe a hint of red light if you catch it at the right angle. Most recon work creates a lot of dust (concrete breaking in a confined space...), but that can be damped... The killer is when you lay fire-proofed walkway boards, and the tunnels fill with an Agent Orange-esque dusty smoke, which trashes your lungs, and that stuff can't be damped. That stuff always looks weird - hellish, in fact - and the tunnels then darken quite a lot... with torchlights swinging through the orange haze.

    The creeping approach of a battery loco is always a bit scary. You'd get into a mode where you feel strangely completely safe (from electrocution), but that changes when a battery appears..... Those movements are of course very strictly controlled. It's quite nice though, to build a virtual train-set with batteries and flats/etc, etc. in the office... and then a few nights later see it appear in real-life at your work-site (often bounded by a tube station) with all the gear/materials you ordered.... in the platform where you'd normally catch a train....... it's a sight that the general public never ever see.... unless they sneak in at 4.30am.

    If you are underground by yourself (with a mate), then you might think that would be scary (depends who your mate is...).... but it isn't, because you absolutely know that nobody else is down there, because you have taken possession of the tunnel. You can make friends with the rats..... although some people used to shoot them with an air-gun as a nightly "eye-sight test". No ghost-rats though.

    Empty stations seem impossibly large compared to when they are full of passengers. As do the London streets at 2.00am - often difficult to recognise where you are. You do sometimes wonder if an American Werewolf is lurking about.... but you never ever get to meet a lost Franka Potente, or any of the charming characters from Creep. But there are lots and lots and lots of tunnels within the stations and around the permanent way, plus storage spaces, air-vents, and access points that the general public have absolutely no idea about. It can be a proper maze down there.

    Open sections, and cut-and-cover are a bit different. Winter on an open section (above ground) can of course be pitch black. When cuttings are overlooked by housing/offices.... there are often very strange noises. I will leave that to your imagination. Cut-and-cover sections can be quite spooky (District Line) - as you get can vast open spaces underground.... with variable lighting/shadows and sounds from random directions. Those spaces can take a bit of getting used to, and you really need to know where your towel is when you are there, especially if you are wandering around those spaces in operational hours (where permitted, without possession).
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2020
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